Cranial Maxillofac Trauma Reconstruction 2019; 12(02): 134-140
DOI: 10.1055/s-0038-1660442
Original Article
Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

Craniomaxillofacial Trauma Experience in Otolaryngology Residency: A National Survey of Program Directors

Melissa S. Oh
1  Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia
,
Anita B. Sethna
1  Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia
,
Oswaldo A. Henriquez
1  Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

08 June 2017

07 April 2018

Publication Date:
22 June 2018 (online)

Abstract

This article aimed to assess the depth and volume of craniomaxillofacial (CMF) trauma exposure and education in otolaryngology residency training in the United States. This is a cross-sectional survey. A 15-question web-based survey was distributed to program directors of 106 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)-approved otolaryngology residency programs to inquire about program size and demographics, trauma coverage, case volume, and education. Responses were collected anonymously. A total of 77 responses were received, representing 73% of residency programs. Seventy-five programs (97%) reported that their residents rotated at a level 1 trauma center, and 72 (94%) covered CMF trauma. Sixty-one programs (79%) included pediatric CMF trauma. The majority of programs (76%) allocated less than 10% of residency-dedicated didactic lecture time to CMF trauma. Residents in all programs typically logged at least 11 to 20 cases before graduation with 24% of programs averaging more than 50 cases per resident. Ninety percent of respondents described the training as “somewhat” to “very adequate.” CMF coverage by the otolaryngology department, number of cases, and dedicated didactic lecture time to CMF trauma were significant factors on the perception of adequate training. The majority of program directors felt that the training in CMF trauma was adequate. Reasons for this may include that most residents rotate at level 1 trauma centers, have exposure to pediatric trauma, encounter an adequate volume of cases, and have dedicated didactic time to CMF education.

Abstract for Oral Presentation

Annual Meeting at Combined Otolaryngology Spring Meetings (COSM), Triological Society, San Diego, CA, April 29, 2017.