J Knee Surg 2019; 32(07): 600-606
DOI: 10.1055/s-0039-1681053
Special Focus Section
Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

Robotics in Total Knee Arthroplasty

Maria Bautista
1  Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Hospital Universitario Fundación Santa Fe de Bogotá, School of Medicine, Universidad del Rosario, Bogota, Colombia
,
Jorge Manrique
2  Rothman Institute, Department of Orthopedic surgery, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
3  Department of Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington
,
William J. Hozack
2  Rothman Institute, Department of Orthopedic surgery, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

02 October 2018

10 January 2019

Publication Date:
01 March 2019 (online)

Abstract

Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a highly successful operation that improves patients' quality of life and functionality. Yet, up to 20% of TKA patients remain unsatisfied with their clinical result. Robotic TKA has gained increased attention and popularity as a means of improving patient satisfaction. The promise of robotic-assisted TKA is that it provides a surgeon with a tool that accurately executes bone cuts according to presurgical planning, as well as provides the surgeon with intraoperative feedback helpful for restoring knee kinematics and soft tissue balance. Several systems are now available, each with their own advantages and disadvantages. Evidence that the use of robotics will lead to improved implant survival, function, and patient-reported outcomes is slowly being accumulated, but this has not been clearly proven to date. Recent literature does show that the use of robotics during TKA is not associated with increased surgical time or complications. The goal of this review is to provide an objective assessment of the evidence surrounding robotic technology for TKA.